Category Archives

Archive of posts published in the category: Foreign policy

Sensitive But Unclassified

from the New York Times,A Closer Look at Hillary Clinton’s Emails on Benghazi by Michale Schmidt: From 2011 to 2012, Sidney Blumenthal, a longtime friend and confidant who was a senior adviser to Mrs. Clinton during her 2008 presidential campaign,…

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A Special Innocence

Bret Stephens writes in The Wall Street Journal, Everything Is Awesome, Mideast Edition Excerpt: I recount these events not just to illustrate the distance between Ben Rhodes’s concept of reality and reality itself. It’s also a question of speed. The…

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Exploiting Government

from the Wall Street Journal, Clinton Cronyism excerpts: For those who have followed the Clintons, this is the latest chapter in an old story. Only weeks ago we learned how foreign governments made donations to the family foundation while Mrs.…

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Churchill’s Road to Serfdom

From National Review, Lion to the Last by Larry Arnn: Excerpts: In June 1945, a month after the Germans’ surrender, with the general-election campaign under way, Winston Churchill gave a 21-minute speech by radio. He was 70 years old. To the shock…

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Ideas Will Remain

from Jeff Jacoby in the Boston Globe,’ I see parchment burning, but the letters are soaring free’ I refuse to excerpt this article. I insist you read it in its entirety.

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Budget Driven Strategy

from Peggy Noonan at the Wall Street Journal, America’s Strategy Deficit: excerpts: On Thursday came the testimony of three former secretaries of state, Henry Kissinger(1973-77), George Shultz (1982-89) and Madeleine Albright (1997-2001). Senators asked them to think aloud about what America’s…

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Natural, Rare and Necessary

From National Review, Lion to the Last by Larry Arnn: Excerpts: Churchill agreed with the socialists, partially, on one issue: He helped invent the social safety net. But he looked for ways to implement it without threatening the free-market system,…

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The Iraq Amnesia Syndrome

From National Review,  The Biggest Lie, by Victor Davis Hanson There were all sorts of untold amnesias about Iraq. No one remembers the 23 writs that were part of the 2002 authorizations that apparently Obama believes are still in effect.…

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Earning Independence

from Bloomberg Kurds Get Closer to a State of Their Own by Eli Lake Excerpt: With Cuba and North Korea dominating the headlines, Americans may have missed the good news from a corner of the world that has provided very little: Iraq. Kurdish peshmerga…

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The Bigger Benghazi Question

From The American Interest, The Case for More Congress In American Foreign Policy, by Walter Russell Mead: Excerpt: At the same time, with our Libyan policy, like the country itself, in ruins, one has the sense that the Benghazi investigation…

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No More Munichs- defined

Conrad Black writes Battle of the Cliches in The National Review excerpt: “No more Munichs” must mean no more complicity in foreign aggression — it must not mean that the West will prevent any injustice that occurs everywhere in the world even if it is…

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Turning on the Spigots

From The Personal And Economic Benefits Of Cheaper Oil at investor’s Business Daily: The U.S. imports about 3.5 billion barrels of oil a year. So a $20 reduction in price is equal to a $70 billion tax cut. And since…

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Terrorism’s Enabler

“In this changing climate, moreover, it did not help that Chomsky, even though he sometimes called himself a libertarian anarchist, repeatedly rushed to apologize for or side with any totalitarian despot, whether Communist or fascist and no matter how murderous,…

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Beyond Containment

“But there was also a big difference here. Reagan’s arms buildup, together with his refusal to accept the Brezhnev Doctrine of “what’s mine is mine, and what’s yours is up for grabs,” signified a return to containment and deterrence. Bush,…

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Inexperienced Foreign Policy Advisors

Bret Stephens writes The Meltdown in the September Commentary. Excerpts: None of these fiascos— for brevity’s sake, I’m deliberately setting to one side the illusory pivot to Asia, the misbegotten Russian Reset, the mishandled Palestinian–Israeli talks, the stillborn Geneva conferences on Syria,…

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A Gun and a Grudge

From Daniel Greenfield at The Sultan Knish, Where the Black Flags Fly Excerpts: About the only reliable source of wealth comes out of the ground and the countries that have it are usually too lazy to get it themselves. That’s…

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The Space Between War and Peace

from The Wall Street Journal Notable and Quotable: Defense analyst Nadia Schadlow writing at warontherocks.com, Aug. 18: President Obama’s commitment to reducing America’s reliance on the military instrument of power is well-known. It has been a constant theme of his…

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Armed Liberalism

Excerpt from America’s Dangerous Aversion to Conflict by Robert Kagan in The Wall Street Journal So the liberal powers tried to reason with them, to understand and even accept their grievances and seek to assuage them, even if this meant…

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History is Tragic

Book Review: ‘World Order’ by Henry Kissinger from The Wall Street Journal by James Traub “The tragedy of Wilsonianism,” Mr. Kissinger writes, “is that it bequeathed to the twentieth century’s decisive power an elevated foreign policy doctrine unmoored from a…

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