Monthly Archives: August 2013

Archive of posts published in the specified Month

Moral and Economic Trade-Offs

“Proponents of redistribution believe they hold the moral high ground. Most of them demand more but have no perspective about where more becomes suboptimal. They mistakenly assume that redistribution consumes only the incremental consumption of the rich. They don’t consider…

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The Trivial Law

Kevin Williamson writes The Front Man in The National Review, 8/5/2013 Excerpts: Barack Obama’s administration is unmoored from the institutions that have long kept the imperial tendencies of the American presidency in check. That is partly the fault of Congress, which has…

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Reading 2013 08 19

Victor Davis Hanson in PJ Media, Obama Bets Against Human Nature—and Usually Loses There are many ways to learn about the bleaker aspects of human nature. One would be to run a pizza shop or have to clean regularly a…

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Reform on the Cheap

“Here we have a rather explicit mismatch between the idea of education embedded in the proposed set of technological solutions and the time-honored idea of education still cherished at least by some colleges. In an ideal world, of course, both…

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The Cost of a Job

Targeting the Wealthy Kills Jobs by T.J.  Rogers in The Wall Street Journal Excerpts: A couple of years ago, I decided to invest in my hometown of Oshkosh, Wis., by building a $1.2 million lakefront restaurant. That restaurant now permanently…

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Political Commercialism

Until Harry Truman wrote his memoirs, the ex-president struggled on an Army pension of $112.56 a month. “I could never lend myself to any transaction, however respectable,” he said, “that would commercialize on the prestige and dignity of the office…

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The Financial Cure is The Disease

“The problem we are dealing with here is not inherent in financial innovation. It is inherent in financial regulation. Private sector models of risk management were undoubtedly imperfect, as the financial crisis made clear. But public sector models of risk…

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Signal to Noise News

“The more frequently you look at data, the more noise you are disproportionally likely to get (rather than the valuable part, called the signal); hence the higher the noise-to-signal ratio. And there is a confusion which is not psychological at…

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Capricious Law

Kevin Williamson writes The Front Man in The National Review, 8/5/2013 Excerpts: Congress’s supine ceding of its powers, and the Obama administration’s usurpation of both legal and extralegal powers, is worrisome. But what is particularly disturbing is the quiet, polite, workaday manner…

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In the Face of Irrefutable Evidence

At an address at a YPO meeting in 1997 at Washington and Lee, Journalist and columnist Jack Germond used the following illustration: A man awoke one morning to his alarm. The time was 5:55 AM. He went to the bathroom…

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Rational Choice in the Face of Massive Ignorance

“And governmental interventions in the economy are distractions—“noise on the line”—that nearly always retard expansion. Failing to see the centrality of entrepreneurial creativity, economists everywhere have counseled governments to attend to the money supply, aggregate demand, consumer confidence, trade imbalances,…

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Debt is not Ownership

“We should also recognize that there is a difference between promoting home ownership and promoting home finance. Canada has no mortgage interest deduction, yet it has a comparable rate of home ownership and fewer leveraged home owners. My first preference…

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The Bane of Institutions

Daniel Greenfield writes in his blog Sultan Knish, The Art of Building Things, 6/10/13. Excerpt: Creativity brings new things into the world, but new things are the bane of institutions which already have too many things to deal with and see such…

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Elites with Good Intentions

“Despite the unending failures of statist economies from the Soviet Union to Eastern Europe, to North Korea, to Cuba, and so on, liberals hold on to the belief that intellectual elites with good intentions can direct human activities better than…

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Legislating from the Executive Branch

Kevin Williamson writes The Front Man in The National Review, 8/5/2013 Excerpts: For example, the president would very much like the unemployment problem to be somewhat abated by the time of the 2014 congressional elections, but he knows that this is unlikely…

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Random Thoughts 2013 08 05

What does it say about Hillary’s tenure as Secretary of State that Russia provides asylums for a major U.S. criminal over our clear objections (reset button anyone) and we close most embassies in the Middle East due to the threat…

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$200 Screwdrivers

  From The Road to Oligarchy by Daniel Greenfield in Sultan Knish Excerpts: Corporate lobbying isn’t just about the proverbial 200 dollar screwdriver. It’s about making it more expensive for some companies to make screwdrivers than others. It’s also about forcing independent screwdriver manufacturers…

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Free Phones for All

  Me and My Obamaphones By Jillian Kay Melchior in National Review. Excerpt: But as with any federal program with too much funding, too little oversight, and perverse financial incentives, Lifeline has become infamous for rampant fraud and abuse. There…

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DC Becomes Like Hollywood

Mark Steyn writes in National Review, Dream Transition Team. Excerpt:  So Mrs. Clinton flew a million miles — to “reset” our relationship with Russia, and lead from behind in the Arab Spring. This weekend, America’s embassies in Egypt, Libya, Saudi…

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The Jews of Poland

  We associate the Holocaust with Germany but Poland was a much larger center of Jewish life and it was nearly totally wiped out.  This is a great achievement.

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