Monthly Archives: October 2013

Archive of posts published in the specified Month

Demonizing Diversity

Victory Davis Hanson writes in The National Review- Medieval Liberals. Excerpts: Reactionary is a good adjective as well, since notions of wealth and poverty are frozen in amber around 1965, as if the technological revolution never took place and the…

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Reading 2013 10 08

http://www.nationalreview.com/article/360583/medieval-liberals-victor-davis-hanson http://www.nationalreview.com/article/360596/tyler-cowens-future-shock-no-more-average-people-michael-barone   http://pjmedia.com/victordavishanson/obama-as-chaos/?singlepage=true   http://nationalreview.com/article/353959/downfall-detroit-mark-steyn

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The Ruthless Concentration of Power

Daniel Greenfield writes in Sultan Knish, Government Money, 3/17/13 Excerpts: How much money has flowed from the Obama Administration to its friends in the private sector in just the last year alone? And how much of that money was used…

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Credentialed Experts vs Democracy

Kevin Williamson writes The Front Man in The National Review, 8/5/2013 Excerpts: The result of this is his utterly predictable approach to domestic politics: appoint a panel of credentialed experts. His faith in the powers of pedigreed professionals is apparently absolute. Consider…

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A Tortured Justification of Obamacare

From The National Review Online Obamacare’s Unconstitutional Origins Tax legislation has to originate in the House; the health-care law didn’t. By Andrew McCarthy Excerpt: It is worth pausing here briefly to rehearse an argument often made in these pages before the Supreme…

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The Real Cost of Government

“That is because the cost of government is not the annual toll in taxes and debt, but the forgone benefits that we would have derived from using all of that capital in innovative and productive ways. The $1 trillion that…

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A Shutdown Reader

Though still treated to more juvenile demonizing in the press and the social media there is more to this shutdown than we usually hear.  Some other perspectives follow.  This is a bit of a summary of what I have posted…

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Subtle Destruction

“But so imperfect is this world that even virtuous, idealistic, humanitarian attempts by government “often gang awry.” There is a right way and a wrong way for government to get involved in humanitarian attempts to better the human condition. One…

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Regulators Reliant on the Regulated

“And the combination of concentration, interbank lending, financial innovation and technological acceleration makes it a system especially prone to crash. Once again, however, the difference between the natural world and the financial world is the role of regulation. Regulation is…

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Feeling Our Pain

Daniel Greenfield writes in his Sultan Knish, Wednesday, The Sun Sets on Washington D.C. Excerpts: Government employees have a 4.2% unemployment rate compared to 8.6% for private sector workers and a union membership rate of 35.9% compared to 6.6% for private…

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A Historical Perspective of Shutdowns

From The National Review Government Shutdowns: A History The refusal of Democrats to negotiate is what makes this one stand out. By Charles C. W. Cooke Excerpts: Not only is it wholly wrong to pretend that the House is expected to…

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Shutdown Gamesmanship

Wesley Pruden writes in The Washington Times, The Cheap Tricks of the Game, Excerpt: “It’s a cheap way to deal with the situation,” an angry Park Service ranger in Washington says of the harassment. “We’ve been told to make life as difficult for people…

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Thoughts on the Shutdown

It may seem juvenile or at least politically risky, and while I think Obamacare is a terrible law I do not know if this is the best way to kill it.  It seems like it is dying under its own…

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The True Masters

Daniel Greenfield writes in his Sultan Knish, Wednesday, The Sun Sets on Washington D.C. Excerpts: There is a word for men who surround themselves with czars, who expand their staffs, who fly their dogs out on separate planes, who amuse themselves…

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The New Left

“In 1971–72, my mind was in a fruitful turmoil regarding my left-wing tendencies. I had begun to notice the appearance of two lefts—one that included my whole family and what it represented, and the other a “new” left, based on…

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DC Armageddon

Daniel Greenfield writes in his Sultan Knish, Government Shuts Down, Nation Descends into Riots, Looting and Cannibalism> Excerpts: With the fall of the government, citizen activists took it upon themselves to chronicle the culture of lawlessness. Men played Gibson guitars made…

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Nonessential Government

Daniel Greenfield writes in his Sultan Knish, Wednesday, The Sun Sets on Washington D.C. Excerpts: The government shutdown has forced Obama to make do with only a quarter of his 1,701 person staff. That would leave 436 “vital” employees. The 90…

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An Illusion of Understanding

“There is so much noise coming from the media’s glorification of the anecdote. Thanks to this, we are living more and more in virtual reality, separated from the real world, a little bit more every day while realizing it less…

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Subjective Peer Review

from the Climate Blog, Watts Up With That,  Why Climate Science is Fallible by Anthony Watts,  Guest essay by Dr. David Deming: Peer review is a highly unreliable process that produces nothing but opinion. A studyconducted in 2010 concluded that reviewers…

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