Tag Archives

Archive of posts published in the tag: Supply Side Economics

The Trickle-Down Calumny

‘Trickle down’ is meaningless and ignorant and does not withstand minimal scrutiny. It hides the greater issues of the size, scope, and expense of government; and whether consumers and investors can allocate resources better than bureaucrats.

Read More

The Laffer Curve at 40

From Bloomberg Businessweek Haley Griffin writes The Napkin Doodle That Launched the Supply-Side Revolution How would you classify the Laffer Curve today? Laffer: It’s the same as always. It works. It’s not Republican, it’s not Democratic, it’s not conservative, it’s not liberal,…

Read More

Subsidized Lethargy

Alan Reynolds writes Demand-Side Policy Gave Us the Big Economic Fizzle in The Wall Street Journal. Excerpt: Demand-side economists focus on incentives to borrow and spend. Supply-side economists focus on incentives to work, save, invest and launch new businesses. Demand-side…

Read More

Why QE-3 Will Fail

Larry Kudlow writes in the National Review Online Obamanomics Has Failed Dismally,  9/14/12 Excerpts: More money doesn’t necessarily mean more growth. More Fed money won’t increase after-tax rewards for risk, entrepreneurship, business hiring, and hard work. Keeping more of what…

Read More

Supply Side Footnotes

Supply side economics remains controversial and poorly understood both by its critics who think it is just  ‘trickle down’ economics: a thinly veiled rationalization to improve the lives of the wealthy at the expense of the poor, and by many…

Read More

Jumping a Fiscal Grand Canyon

There is an axiom that if you have to jump a canyon you don’t want to do it in small steps.  If you have to lose a leg to cancer or gangrene, you do not make the task any less…

Read More

The Right Economic Mix

Brian Domitrovic’s Econoclasts writes of the rise of supply side economics as proposed by Nobel prize winning economist Robert Mundell and his intellectual emissaries, most notably Arthur Laffer. The core of Mundell’s theory was that monetary policy should do only…

Read More