Tag Archives

Archive of posts published in the tag: regulations

Uber Challenges the Regulatory State

Uber reduces DUIs, traffic fatalities, and accidents. The drivers are safer because it is cashless and the entire trip is tracked online. And they carry more insurance than the cabs. They are more available and better serve their customers. By…

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Localized Regulations

from The Wall Street Journal Encouraged by the Feds, Cities Are Punishing Business by John Ella The challenge for employers is not only the cost of higher wages or paid sick time. Multistate employers compelled to monitor new developments in…

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The Power to Destroy

An important axiom of government is to imagine that the law or regulation you propose or champion is in the hand of your worst nightmare.  Would you want that person to have the same power you are proposing to be…

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Racist Regulations

Jonah Goldberg writes Martin O’Malley’s modern-day know-nothingness at AEI excerpt: The first minimum wage laws were advocated by progressive economists on the assumption that if you forced employers to pay a “white man’s wage,” they’d only hire white men. As the…

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An Economy of Trust

In a few previous posts I explored the dynamic of new commercial enterprises like Uber (read Uber Libertarians in American Thinker)  that defied the ability of the regulatory state to deal with the rapid development of very large commercial communities.…

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The Modern Source of Abusive Power

From The National Review George Will writes Government for the Strongest and Richest Intellectually undemanding progressives, excited by the likes of Senator Elizabeth Warren (D., Mass.) — advocate of the downtrodden and the Export-Import Bank — have at last noticed…

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Boycotting Las Vegas

Apparently there is a problem in Las Vegas with cabbies intentionally taking long routes in order to overcharge.  This article explains  the various Rube Goldberg schemes the government has regulated to try and control this practice. As you would expect,…

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Complexity is a Bigger Problem than Size

“My own view is that the problem of too big to fail is really about complexity, not size, and thus “break-up” proposals should focus on simplifying the megabanks so that they can be easily resolved in bankruptcy or the FDIC’s…

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Debt is not Ownership

“We should also recognize that there is a difference between promoting home ownership and promoting home finance. Canada has no mortgage interest deduction, yet it has a comparable rate of home ownership and fewer leveraged home owners. My first preference…

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Taming American Capitalism

Thomas Hemphill and Mark Perry write The Myth of ‘Cowboy Capitalism’ in The American, 3/3/13. Excerpts: The Code of Federal Regulations (established in 1938) is where all the administrative rules of U.S. federal agencies are compiled; American businesses, employees, and…

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An Insurable Interest

“Dodd-Frank fixed some of that by giving both the SEC and the CFTC authority to regulate the derivatives market. Among other things, the legislation mandated that the SEC and CFTC, working with the banking regulators, set standards for the amount…

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The Other Taxes

While tax rates are often stated as the burden on individuals and businesses there are other “mandated expenses” that are much more insidious.  Federal agencies are often charged with funding themselves with fines and penalties. Much too often these fines…

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Individualism and Selfishness

Occasionally I find an article that raises terrific questions, even if they fall short on the answers.  Kurt Anderson writes The Downside of Liberty in The New York Times, 7/3/12. Anderson ponders: Why had the revolution dreamed up in the…

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The Destruction of Judgment

Jonah Goldberg writes Symptoms of a Sick Culture in Townhall, 7/6/12. Excerpts: Two days before the Fourth of July, Lopez was fired for helping rescue a man drowning 1,500 feet outside of his designated zone. “It was a long run,…

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Making Criminals of Us All

In my three or more decades of business experience and relationships I have only encountered a very small portion of the business owners. Yet it is striking how many I have encountered that had an encounter with the government that…

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Bricks in a Pick Up

We all benefit from an economy that is growing, but growth is slowed by an endless array of friction costs mandated by the government.  When the economy is robust these friction costs appear to be minimal because they can be…

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Reason on Gibson Guitars

A Follow up on the Gibson Guitar raid under the Lacey Act:

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Laws, Rules, and Discretion

John Cochrane writes in his blog The Grumpy Economist, Three Kinds of Regulations, 1/2/2012: Excerpts: For regulation is not “more” or “less,” something you just pour into a cup until you’ve had enough like a good beer. Regulation is most…

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The Failure of State Intervention

Daniel Hannan writes in the UK The Telegraph with Memo to the Occupy Protesters: here are ten things we evil capitalists really think. Point 6: Nor, by the way, does state intervention seem to be an effective way to promote…

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The Mad Pursuit of Zero

We pay a frightful price in lost jobs and economic opportunity for what I think of as the mad pursuit of zero.  When, at great expense, we have reduced the amount of a given pollutant to a few parts in…

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