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Archive of posts published in the tag: meritocracy

The Neo Progressive Era

While the second Wilson Administration pushed illiberal policies such as the Sedition Act of 1918, today we have voluntarily embraced illiberal mean to achieve liberal ends. I find this even more disturbing. The cancel culture and politically correct curbs on free speech has eroded legitimate debate and made the voting booth the last remaining safe space. This is magnified by a media that has replaced objective journalistic standards will the protection of partisan narratives.

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The Limits of the Meritocracy

The meritocracy sounds good but like all centralized policy is subject to overemphasize some objectives and disregard ingredients that have more influence than they realize.  Intelligence may be an important attribute but there are other character traits that may be  responsible for the outcome we attribute to intelligence. Steve Jobs was not the result of an IQ test.

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The Problem With the Meritocracy

from Atlantic Magazine The Bow-Tied Bard of Populism by McKay Coppins about Tucker Carlson To the extent that Carlson’s on-air commentary these days is guided by any kind of animating idea, it is perhaps best summarized as a staunch aversion to whatever…

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The Fall of the Meritocracy

From Glenn Reynolds in The USA Today, Trump and the crisis of the meritocracy Well, now they’ve heard it, and they’ve also heard that a lot of Americans resent the meritocrats’ insulation from what’s happening elsewhere, especially as America’s unfortunate record…

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Why Government Should Be Irrelevant

by Henry Oliner Deidre McCloskey in Bourgeois Equality and Joel Mokyr in Culture of Growth examine the incredible growth in human betterment since 1850. Thomas Malthus predicted a dismal future for human kind from the very logical prediction that food…

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The Wild American Arena

Victor Davis Hanson writes America’s Big Fat Advantage in Townhall (online) 4/21/13 Excerpts: The mixture of consumer capitalism and constitutionally protected free speech — and all sorts of races, religions and ethnicities — sometimes means that America can be a…

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A False Sense of Intellectual Superiority

In The American Spectator (online version) Boston University Professor Angelo Codevilla writes “America’s Ruling Class- And the Perils of Revolution” (July – August 2010 issue).  I recommend reading the entire article  (about 22 pages printed). It is well worth the…

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