Tag Archives

Archive of posts published in the tag: Glenn Harlan Reynolds

Politicizing Crime

John Fund writes in The National Review, Injudicious Criminal Justice in Florida The prosecutorial misconduct in Zimmerman’s trial reveals a judicial system run amok: Excerpts: Recall that the investigation of Trayvon Martin’s shooting was taken out of the hands of…

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Wanted: Skin in The Game

From Glenn Harlan Reynolds in USA Today Penalties for politicians: We entrust an inordinate amount of power to people who don’t feel any pain when we fall down. Excerpts: I’d favor some changes that put accountability back in. First, I’d…

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Moral Capital

In February I posted The Entrepreneurial Deficit – a collection of articles and comments on the absence of startups and it s long term impact on the economcy. Glenn Harlan Reynolds, law professor and writer of the excellent blog Instapundit, expands on the theme…

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The Political Return on Investment

Glen Harlan Reynolds wrote Are we living in the Hunger Games?, 11/27/12 in USA Today. Excerpts: Washington is rich not because it makes valuable things, but because it is powerful. With virtually everything subject to regulation, it pays to spend…

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The World’s Largest Insurance Broker

Americans are losing trust in government by Glenn Harlan Reynolds  in USA Today February 11, 2013 Excerpt: New York Times blogger Nate Silver — best known for his prescient election projections in 2012 — matches up the data on distrust of government with the…

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Negative Marginal Returns on Government

Americans are losing trust in government by Glenn Harlan Reynolds  in USA Today February 11, 2013 Excerpt: Nobel-prize-winning economist Ronald Coase made that point in a 1998 interview: “When I was editor of The Journal of Law and Economics, we published a whole series of…

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Inflated Self Importance

Americans are losing trust in government by Glenn Harlan Reynolds in USA Today February 11, 2013 Excerpt: A government limited to relatively few things — visible things, obviously relevant to the common good — can probably do those things well. As…

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