Tag Archives

Archive of posts published in the tag: corruption

Flawed vs Corrupt

“He regards Mr. Trump as deeply flawed but Ms. Clinton as deeply corrupt. There’s a difference. Mr. Buckley, a law professor at George Mason, uses the term “corruption” in its classic sense: the use of governmental power to enrich oneself. By that definition, given the revelations about Ms. Clinton in such books as Peter Schweizer’s “Clinton Cash” (2015), which detailed the ways in which certain extremely wealthy people purchased access to the secretary of state, Ms. Clinton is a fine instance of corruption at its unsavory worst.”

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Politics and Profits

From Thomas Donlan At Barron’s, Trump’s CEOs: In the Wrong Place at the Wrong Time (I like the title in the print edition better, There’s No Profit in Politics) Business executives as a group rarely show the kind of sophistication that the…

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The Most Destructive Form of Political Corruption

from The Worst Perversion, by Kevin Williamson at National Review: A liberal society with decent government requires that the pursuit of political power be insulated from the exercise of political power. That is why we have a Hatch Act and why…

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Politiphobes

From The Atlantic, How American Politics Went Insane by Jonathan Rauch Using polls and focus groups, Hibbing and Theiss-Morse found that between 25 and 40 percent of Americans (depending on how one measures) have a severely distorted view of how government and…

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A Cancer of the Federal Government

William McGurn makes a great and scary point, more worrisome than the ethical abuses  and lies that surround the Clintons- from the Wall Street Journal, Even Worse Than Clinton’s Emails It’s a disturbing pattern, and unfortunately it’s not limited to State.…

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The Spirit of the Truth

There are varying degrees of lies.  Ignorance is not a lie, making a prediction that does not come true is not a lie, and it seems that in the world of politics making a promise that you do not keep…

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The Upside of a Little Corruption

From The Atlantic, How American Politics Went Insane by Jonathan Rauch Parties, machines, and hacks may not have been pretty, but at their best they did their job so well that the country forgot why it needed them. Politics seemed almost to…

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The Spirit of the Law

Jonah Goldberg writes in National Review, Hillary and Her Wheelbarrows Using the clever wheelbarrow analogy Goldberg notes: This whole argument misses the point. What we know from these e-mails, particularly thanks to an analysis by the Associated Press, is that…

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The Medicis of the Ozarks

From Jonah Goldberg at National Review, House Clinton and the Wages of Corruption The money isn’t the primary issue with the Clintons and it never was. Sure, sure, they like being rich. They like flying around in private planes. They…

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Shameless

From Victor Davis Hanson at National Review, How the Clintons Got Rich Selling Influence While Decrying Greed The Clinton litany of whiny victimization and excuse-making reflects that sense of entitlement — one not uncommon among academics, journalists, and politicians who…

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Stymied by Democracy

from Jonah Goldberg at National Review, The Bogeymen of the ‘Billionaire Class’: The simple fact is that almost everywhere you look, the super-rich are being stymied by democracy. In 2014, David Brat, an unknown academic, defeated the second-most-powerful Republican in Congress,…

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Distrusting Democracy

from the Wall Street Journal, George Melloan’s Vast Right-Wing Conspiracy 2.0 Ms. Mayer is highly selective about which super-wealthy dabblers in politics she wants to expel. Warren Buffett, whose $62 billion fortune ranks second only to that of Bill Gates($76 billion), is not…

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Institutionalized Corruption

All of this helps us understand how the spoils system became rampant in the nineteenth century. The resources required to win a nationwide presidential election were too massive for parties to raise on their own, and so they turned to…

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The Criminal Candidate

from The Wall Street Journal Hillary’s E-mail Story Unravels by Kimberly Strassel Excerpt: Nothing Mrs. Clinton has said so far on the subject is correct. The Democratic presidential aspirant on March 10 held a press conference pitched as her first…

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Parochial Power

To be clear, the problem is not with expansive governmental powers per se. Rather, it has to do with the institutions of government that exercise those powers. Specifically, we use eighteenth century institutions, originally meant to do much less, to…

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Structural Corruption

The country has increasingly demanded nationalistic authority for the government, but has refused to abandon the parochialism inherent to the original design. Indeed, Americans are wont to celebrate the contradiction: we unabashedly demand that our government exercise sweeping powers to…

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The Edge of Legal

From The Wall Street Journal, The Clinton ‘Charity’ Begins at Home by Kimberly Strassel excerpts: The media’s focus is on Hillary Clinton’s time as secretary of state, and whether she took official actions to benefit her family’s global charity. But…

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Sidney Blumenthal and Hillary Clinton

from the Wall Street Journal, Who is Sidney Blumenthal?: excerpts: They reinforce, for starters, that the Clinton Foundation is not and never has been a charity. Bill and Hillary created it in 2001 as a vehicle to assist their continuing…

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Clinton Fraud Hidden in Plain Sight

From The Wall Street Journal, How the Clintons Get Away With It by Peggy Noonan excerpts: I wonder if any aspirant for the presidency except Hillary Clinton could survive such a book. I suspect she can because the Clintons are unique…

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Exploiting Government

from the Wall Street Journal, Clinton Cronyism excerpts: For those who have followed the Clintons, this is the latest chapter in an old story. Only weeks ago we learned how foreign governments made donations to the family foundation while Mrs.…

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