Monthly Archives: August 2017

Archive of posts published in the specified Month

Losing Their Critical Advantage

Mark Lilla writes a great analysis of the rise of identity politics in the Wall Street Journal,  The Liberal Crackup All that began to change when the New Left shattered in the 1970s, in no small part due to identity…

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The Quicksand of Optimism

from the WSJ and William Galston,  What Would Madison Do About the Budget? When it comes to government, I am a die-hard Madisonian. The chief intellectual architect of our constitutional order knew that public officials would always be torn between…

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The Identity Politics Cop-out

from the editors of The Wall Street Journal, The Poison of Identity Politics Yet the focus on Mr. Trump is also a cop-out because it lets everyone duck the deeper and growing problem of identity politics on the right and left.…

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Clarifying Wage Growth

from The Wage Paradox Explained from the Wall Street Journal So why haven’t wages risen faster amid an increase in hiring and unfilled jobs? One answer is that wages have actually been growing at a faster clip—around 4% to 5%—at least…

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Social Media and Our Political Divide

from Selena Zito,  Judgey about the way people dress? You’re killing America Spend one hour in the mile-long factory, which is sited to take advantage of both the region’s rich clay soil, perfect for making ceramics, and the skills passed on…

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The Devil’s Compact

from Liberalism’s Summer of ’17 by Daniel Henninger at The WSJ For decades, urban liberalism has sold itself as a compact between government and taxpayers. The people paid, and with that revenue liberal politicians would deliver infrastructure, services, economic opportunity and civil…

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The Retreat of Liberal Political Consciousnesses

Mark Lilla writes a great analysis of the rise of identity politics in the Wall Street Journal,  The Liberal Crackup As a teacher, I am increasingly struck by a difference between my conservative and progressive students. Contrary to the stereotype,…

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What I’m Reading 2017 08 13

Do I Make Myself Clear by Harold Evans– great editing advice and examples.  Clear writing is a moral imperative.  Must read for any non-fiction writer. The Treat of Versailles- A Concise History by Michael Neiberg.  “It was a typical Treaty…

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Prior Commitments to Liberalism

Are Conservatives Really Just Liberals?  Conservatism, for example, may include liberal capitalism, but with a prior commitment to the dignity of the human person, the redeeming covenant of marriage, and the goods of family, faith, and community. Those are the…

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Plutonomies

from Liberalism’s Summer of ’17 by Daniel Henninger at The WSJ Economists for Citigroup have called cities like New York and San Francisco “plutonomies”—urban economies propped up by a plutocratic minority, which is to say, young professionals inured to both taxes and nearby…

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Economically Liberal, Socially Conservative

How Trump Won, in Two Dimensions by  F.H. Buckley in the WSJ: Most Hillary Clinton voters were deeply liberal on both axes. The surprise was the Trump voters, who were very conservative on social issues but moderate on economic ones.…

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The Critical Difference Between Good and Bad Regulation

Mark Levin is a rabid right wing radio talk show host.  Because I at least scan about any title with the word progressivism in it, I viewed his latest book Rediscovering Americanism: and the Tyranny of Progressivism and was pleasantly surprised at…

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Time Guilty of Journalistic Malfeasance Against Charles Koch

from Reason Magazine online,  Time Smears Charles Koch in Headline; Changes Headline, Still Misses His Point by Brian Doherty What Charles Koch said: “I think we can have growth rates in excess of 4%. When I’m talking about growth rates, I’m not…

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Tough is Cheap

From Kevin Williamson in NR, From Ritual to Bromance That is because what is missing in Washington isn’t toughness. In the postwar era — the era in which the modern American welfare state as we know it was created — Washington…

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Targeted Resentment

How the Democrats Lost the White Working Class– Book review of White Working Class by Joan Williams- reviewed by Joe Queenan in Barron’s: “The working class…has been asked to swallow a lot of economic pain, while elites have focused on…

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Passive Aggressive Investing

from Barron’s and Randall Forsyth, Is It Time to Return to Active Stock-Picking? What’s needed, say some outspoken active investors, is a return to old-fashioned Houseman–Smith Barney securities selection, rather than the tide of passive investing washing over the financial…

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The Party of Contempt

From Ted Van Dyk at The Wall Street Journal, The Democrats’ Biggest Problem Is Cultural: Political scientist V.O. Key famously observed that “the voters are not fools.” Millions of them, including traditional Democrats, driven by anger and frustration, abandoned their political…

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Legislating Hysteria

Another gem from Kevin Williamson, A National State of Non-Emergency in National Review: What people remember of that episode is Senator Edward Kennedy’s infamous speech describing “Robert Bork’s America,” “a land in which women would be forced into back-alley abortions, blacks…

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The Need for Permanence in the Tax Code

from The WSJ, Phil Gramm and Michael Salon, Reagan Cut Taxes, Revenue Boomed:  As inflation plummeted from the CBO’s projected average annual rate of 8.3% for 1982-86 to an average of 3.8%, revenue compared with projections tumbled $22 billion in 1982…

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The Perversion of Individualism

Mark Levin is a rabid right wing radio talk show host.  Because I at least scan about any title with the word progressivism in it, I viewed his latest book Rediscovering Americanism: and the Tyranny of Progressivism and was pleasantly surprised at…

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