Monthly Archives: March 2017

Archive of posts published in the specified Month

A Nice Vague Enemy

from Word Games by Kevin Williamson in National Review Before the neocons were the neocons, they were in more fanciful minds “the Illuminati.” For Henry Ford, the neocon was “the international Jew.” (The Stalinists called them “rootless cosmopolitans,” a term recently revived…

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My Three Favorite Pedestrian Pens

Uniball Signo .38 Pilot Juice .38 PaperMate Ink Joy I prefer fine points. These all write thin lines in gel with absolutely zero skipping,  I use them all everyday.  I enjoy my collection of fountain pens, a habit I got…

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Economic Bullshit Detectors

From The Grumpy Economist, a review/ commentary  by John Cochrane on an essay by Russ Roberts on Economic Humility In sum, I think economics provides an excellent set of bullshit detectors. This is my stock answer about my own professional expertise.…

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Supply, Demand, and Finance

Kevin Williamson follows in the footsteps of Henry Hazlitt in his clarity of economic and political issues. Like Hazlitt he is not a professionally trained economist, but brings a writer’s clarity to the subject.  I have probably excerpted him more…

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Means Matter

One of the problems with the ‘ends justify the means’ mentality is determining whose ends you are pursuing. The idea of a living constitution sounds fine to the left as long as they are pursuing the goals the left values,…

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Invisible Subsidies from the Rich

from Kevin Williamson in National Review, Plans, Trains, and Automobiles Question: Do we want our health-care system to be more like the spontaneous order that produces both awesome cars and terrible traffic, or do we want it to be more like…

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Government by Proxy

From National Review, George Will writes ‘Big Government’ Is Ever Growing, on the Sly In his 2014 book “Bring Back the Bureaucrats,” he argued that because the public is, at least philosophically, against “big government,” government has prudently become stealthy…

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The Problem With the Meritocracy

from Atlantic Magazine The Bow-Tied Bard of Populism by McKay Coppins about Tucker Carlson To the extent that Carlson’s on-air commentary these days is guided by any kind of animating idea, it is perhaps best summarized as a staunch aversion to whatever…

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The Corruption of Liberalism

From Shelby Steele in the WSJ, The Exhaustion of American Liberalism Today’s liberalism is an anachronism. It has no understanding, really, of what poverty is and how it has to be overcome. It has no grip whatever on what American exceptionalism…

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Collegiate Rot

Intolerance and demonization of dissent is too common on American college campuses and the despicable behavior at Middlebury in Vermont to the speaking engagement of Charles Murray is indicative of a cultural and intellectual rot from much of the left.…

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How to Properly Dismantle the Deep State

From National Review, Jonah Goldberg, Down with the Administrative State: Deconstructing the administrative state is a kind of nightingale’s song for many intellectual conservatives, particularly my friends in the Claremont Institute’s orbit. It’s been great fun watching mainstream journalists, who…

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New Concentrations of Capital

From The Disturbing New Facts About American Capitalism by Jason Zweig in The WSJ Modern capitalism is built on the idea that as companies get big, they become fat and happy, opening themselves up to lean and hungry competitors that can…

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The Party of Hate

A gem from Kevin Williamson at National Review, Fake Hate Crimes: There are many strands of conservatism and many kinds of conservatives. There are those such as myself whose views are shaped by the epistemic critique of central planning associated with…

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A New Unfairness

In National Review George Will reviews the new dystopian novel, The Mandibles: A Family, 2029–2047, by Lionel Shriver from the novel: “The state starts moving money around. A little fairness here, little more fairness there. . . . Eventually social democracies all arrive at the…

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The Fall of the Meritocracy

From Glenn Reynolds in The USA Today, Trump and the crisis of the meritocracy Well, now they’ve heard it, and they’ve also heard that a lot of Americans resent the meritocrats’ insulation from what’s happening elsewhere, especially as America’s unfortunate record…

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The Misleading and the Irrelevant

Wise investors learn to ignore the daily fluctuations and the daily stock market news. I am amused at the market reports at the end of the day explaining why the market went up or down.  It would have been much…

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Dictators in Exile

From Daniel Greenfield at The Sultan Knish, The Elites are Revolting If you make tangible goods or have a mortgage, you are more likely to want borders and a nation. If on the other hand you deal largely in intangibles,…

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The Collapse of Work

from Commentary, Nicholas Eberstadt, Our Miserable 21st Century On Wall Street and in some parts of Washington these days, one hears that America has gotten back to “near full employment.” For Americans outside the bubble, such talk must seem nonsensical.…

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The New Populism

From Noah Rothman at Commentary, The Age of Emotion and Unreason The elites and experts in whom society has placed its trust have underperformed over the last decade. This phenomenon was discussed at length in the latest COMMENTARY podcast. In virtually every sector…

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Populist Rhethoric

From Kevin Williamson at National Review, Wishful Thinking, Again: Nobody wants to be the first to offer any policy specifics, because there are only two kinds of policy specifics: Those that are transparently unserious and those that are unpopular, at…

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