Monthly Archives: September 2016

Archive of posts published in the specified Month

Known and Unknown Risks

No government policy can remove the risk of investment; the best they can do is not add to the risks by adding uncertainty to the environment. The reason that strangers from all over the country will congregate to a blackjack…

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O’Sullivan’s First Law of Politics

From Kevin Williamson at National Review,  Move On MoveOn.org was founded by Clinton toadies for the purpose of Clinton toadying, though it eventually succumbed to what we must understand as a corollary to O’Sullivan’s First Law of Politics. O’Sullivan’s First…

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How Government Is Becoming Irrelevant

What amazes me in reading twentieth century history is how much incredible progress we made in spite of two horrific wars, massive failures of authoritarian utopian schemes, several major economic collapses, and the rise of tribal violence. Perhaps the difference…

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The Stability of Minority Rights

“The modern undergraduate assigned The Federalist Papers usually makes the reasonable assumption that faction is dangerous because political fragmentation and contentiousness are to be avoided. The real point of Federalist 10 is counterintuitive: Republicanism is imperiled when society is not…

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The Freshest Ideas from 1916

  from the editors of The National Review, Hilary’s Disastrous Economic Plan But it is a statement of Mrs. Clinton’s priorities, which are giving handouts to her corporate allies, strengthening the whip hand of politicians over health care, bribing the Sanders-Warren…

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Targeted Inflation

Henry Hazlitt wrote Economics in One Lesson in 1946 and it is still a classic. Hazlitt was a reporter, not a credentialed economist and he brought the dry concepts of economics to the lay reader.  Kevin Williamson, a journalist as…

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A Cancer of the Federal Government

William McGurn makes a great and scary point, more worrisome than the ethical abuses  and lies that surround the Clintons- from the Wall Street Journal, Even Worse Than Clinton’s Emails It’s a disturbing pattern, and unfortunately it’s not limited to State.…

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The Easy Target

from Kyle Smith at The New York Post,  Why ‘white trash’ Americans are flocking to Donald Trump Nancy Pelosi says blue-collar white men vote “against their own economic interests” because of guns, gays and God, “God being the woman’s right…

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The Home Ownership Myth

from The Wall Street Journal, The Housing Non Crisis The home ownership rate is a largely meaningless statistic that has more to do with politics than economics. For starters, it promotes the myth that owning a home is the key…

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Deplorable, Indeed

In politics a ‘gaffe’ is when someone accidentally speaks the truth. Hillary’s gaffe about the ‘deplorables’ is just her being honest about how she, her Hollywood media sycophants and most modern Progressives view the flyover country. For the modern Progressives…

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The Real Victim of Hate

from Bret Stephens in The Wall Street Journal,  The Meaning of An Olympic Snub: In his essay, Mr. Johnson called anti-Semitism a “highly infectious” disease capable of becoming “endemic in certain localities and societies,” and “by no means confined to…

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Deplorable and Proud

from David Goldman at The Asian TImes, Deplorably, Trump is going to win The presidential election was over the moment the word “deplorable” made its run out of Hillary Clinton’s unguarded mouth. As the whole world now knows, Clinton told a Lesbian-Gay-Bisexual-Transgender fundraiser…

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The Great Irony of Majoritarianism

From National Affairs George Will writes The Limits of Majority Rule.  I strongly recommend you read the entire essay. an excerpt: So, we must ask: How aberrant, or how frequent, are abusive majorities? A related but different question is: When legislatures, which…

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Violating Horizontal Equity

From The NYT and economist Greg Mankiw,  Why Taxing Fairly Means Not Taxing Inheritances: Excerpt: From my perspective, the estate tax is a bad way to tax the rich because it violates a principle that economists call horizontal equity. The…

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A Career Path in Fraud

From Kevin Williamson at National Review, The Facts about Medicaid Fraud Some perspective: We’re spending more than seven times as much on improper, illegal federal payments as we do on NASA. We’re spending nearly 20 times as much on improper,…

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A Thousand Course Smorgasboard

from The Clinton Plan’s Growth Deficit by John Cochrane in The Wall Street Journal The rest of Mrs. Clinton’s economic agenda is a thousand-course smorgasbord of government expansions, with the same deficiencies. A random sample: Higher taxes on capital gains and corporations.…

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The Spirit of the Truth

There are varying degrees of lies.  Ignorance is not a lie, making a prediction that does not come true is not a lie, and it seems that in the world of politics making a promise that you do not keep…

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Reformed to Death

From The Atlantic, How American Politics Went Insane by Jonathan Rauch Chaos syndrome is a chronic decline in the political system’s capacity for self-organization. It begins with the weakening of the institutions and brokers—political parties, career politicians, and congressional leaders and committees—that…

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Hillary’s World

From John Cochrane at The Grumpy Economist,  Clinton Plan: There are no numbers here anywhere. The $275 billion is clearly just a made up number that sounds sort of big but not so big as to attract tax-and-spend criticism. Because…

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The Dirty Float

from the Wall Street Journal, Judy Shelton in Trump’s Contribution to Sound Money The source of trade anxiety is a broken global monetary system that distorts price signals with sharp currency moves. No serious economist would claim today that the…

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