Monthly Archives: November 2013

Archive of posts published in the specified Month

The IPCC and The Answers You Get

In American Thinker,  IPCC ‘s Bogus Evidence for Global Warming by S. Fred Singer: Excerpt: In spite of much effort, the IPCC has never succeeded in demonstrating that climate change is significantly affected by human activities — and in particular,…

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Obama and Nixon

Kevin Williamson writes The Front Man in The National Review, 8/5/2013 Excerpts: We have to some extent been here before. It is a testament to the success of free-market ideas that it is impossible to imagine President Obama making the announcement that President…

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It’s The Ideas, Stupid

Daniel Greenfield writes in The Sultan Knish, Apologies from Utopia. Excerpts: Obama had boasted that he was a better speechwriter than his speechwriters and a better political director than his political directors. But apparently he’s not a better programmer than…

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Institutionalism

Daniel Greenfield writes in his blog Sultan Knish, The Art of Building Things, 6/10/13. Excerpts: The seduction of the collective as builder however is not limited to countries that flew the red flag.  When Obama and Warren proclaimed that there were no…

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Libertarian (and other) Cop Outs

Derek Hunter writes The Problem With Libertarians in Town Hall: Libertarians have devolved from the pro-liberty wing of the right side of the ledger to the annoying kid who, when he doesn’t get 100 percent of what he wants, takes…

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Why Politics Matter

“While science, medicine, art, poetry, architecture, chess, space, sports, number theory and all things hard and beautiful promise purity, elegance and sometimes even transcendence, they are fundamentally subordinate. In the end, they must bow to the sovereignty of politics. “Politics,…

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The Real Forces of Decline

“It is perverse and self-defeating for conservative CFOs to focus on the federal government’s profit and loss statement as if it were some test of fiscal virtue and the path to national revival. The key issue is not the prodigal…

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A Necessary Evil or a Necessary Good

From Jonah Goldberg in The National Review Online, Father Knows Best: The president’s more intellectually honest defenders have said exactly that. “Vast swathes of policy are based on the correct presumption that people don’t know what’s best for them. Nothing…

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Expert Problems

“Expert problems (in which the expert knows a lot but less than he thinks he does) often bring fragilities, and acceptance of ignorance the reverse.3 Expert problems put you on the wrong side of asymmetry. Let us examine the point…

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The Permanent Bureaucracy

Kevin Williamson writes The Front Man in The National Review, 8/5/2013 Excerpts: Democracy never lasts long,” Adams famously said. “It soon wastes, exhausts and murders itself. There was never a democracy that did not commit suicide.” For liberal regimes, a very common starting…

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The Unique Challenge of Overturning Obamacare

From The Weekly Standard, Killing Obamacare by Jay Cost: Why should we believe that the federal government is remotely capable of managing something as complicated as American health care? The complexities of the task make a mockery of the very notion of…

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Wrong is Different from Evil, But It’s Still Wrong

“The federal budget suggests that just over 20 percent of what the national government does involves the provision of public goods, and the rest involves taking from A and giving to B because politicians want it that way. This isn’t…

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Strong Enforcement of Simple Regulations

“Instead of exhausting ourselves drawing up hopelessly complex codes of ‘macro-prudential’ or ‘counter-cyclical’ regulation, let us go back to Bagehot’s world, where individual prudence – rather than mere compliance  was the advisable course, precisely because the authorities were powerful and…

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