Tag Archives

Archive of posts published in the tag: National Review

The Futility of a National Conversation

Our founding was a radical effort to apply principles of democracy and liberty over a large geographic area. Before it had applied largely to city-states. As the country expanded we decry the lack of a national consensus which was never meant to exist, and have lost the value of the potential of 50 laboratories, engaged to find the best solutions.

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Anti-Fragile Democracy

The idea of central control of individual freedom is fraught with contradictions and has become our greatest challenge. The Progressive Era is where this came to a head and majoritarian democracy edged priority over individual and minority rights. This battle between Progressive majoritarianism manifested in an activist president and the Constitutional protection of individual rights defines our current political debate.

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Progressive Rationalizations

Modern progressives may reject the racist roots of the minimum wage, but they still adhere to a central power and distrust of constitutional principles. They fail to account for the progress of the conflicting ideologies such as spontaneous orders and markets. They fail to acknowledge that the constitutional distrust of central authority still has merit.

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Leveraging the Free Minds of the World

America’s success is a combination of constitutional liberty, heterogeneous culture that has a healthy disrespect for authority, solid protection of property rights, a respect for the common man and a classless society, and willingness to risk and fail. There are certainly hundreds of other attributes, but the combination is uniquely American.  Government’s function is to foster and protect the elements of our productive society. 

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The FANGs are Old News

Great moves forward, disruptive ground changing innovations do not happen consistently. They do not adhere to a plan or a budget.  The best we can do is create an environment that does not stifle them,  that attracts the bright and the motivated, but we do not know if they come from great tax policies, cultural collusion, ethnic diversity, great education, or just an environment of free thinkers.

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Isolating Blue States

It is a money decision.  Trump money-balled the electoral college and targeted just enough to win.  It is a poor investment to invest in races that are so overwhelmingly blue.  The result in the current scenario us that the most populous centers do not get a seat at the table and have little leverage to gain any. Thus the critical loss of the state tax deduction that hurts them disproportionately.  (now they have to argue that their wealthy taxpayers deserve a break.)

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Policy and Attitude

“President Trump’s governance this year has been more conservative than that of George W. Bush or even Reagan. He has slashed the bureaucracy, cutting regulations at a maniacal clip. He has inserted constitutionalist appellate judges at a historic rate. He’s cut taxes. He’s looked to box in Russia in Ukraine while building up our alliances in Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Jordan, and Israel. He’s ended the individual mandate and he’s cut taxes.”

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A Better Solution to Citizens United

“Those who remain concerned about the issue of money in politics may be focused on the wrong tool.  What disturbs the proper representation is not money as much as restrictive ballot access laws.  Super pacs control the money but still lack the access and thus must use the parties as their vehicles.”

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The Irony of American Leadership

From Victor Davis Hanson
“we need to take a deep breath and concede that sometimes past mellifluous appeasement is more dangerous than present flamboyant deterrence — just as the sober and discreet can be more adroit in warping the Constitution through distortions and corruptions of the Justice Department, the IRS, the FBI, and the FISA courts than are the profane and rambunctious.”

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Hard Headed and Soft Hearted

from the Remnant Podcast Episode 14
Jonah Goldberg and Arthur Brooks
The ideal quadrant for Brooks is to be heard headed and soft hearted. Seek policies to help the unfortunate, but be realistic that work is important, long term dependency is soul stifling, and perverse incentives make the problem worse.  Articulate limits, stop demagoguery, and be realistic about human nature. 

As Paul Ryan said, “Don’t let the safety net become a hammock.”

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Why Social Media is a Sucker for Bad Reporting

The point is that the subject is much more complicated than most are willing to accept. Even the most respected journalists are seduced more by the political angle than accuracy and open mindedness.  This travesty is multiplied thousands of times on the social media by the lazy who read for confirmation rather than information.

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Benign Neglect

Kevin Williamson at National Review- “A great deal of what’s best about the modern world is the result of nerds messing around in their garages: Google, the modern automobile business, rock ’n’ roll. Thank goodness nobody took it seriously enough to try to regulate it, manage it, and direct it — which would only have deformed it.”

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Progressive Wolf Mongering

“In other words, in our polarized times, finding the proper sense of proportion might be among your greatest patriotic duties. Save your fury for a real crisis. “

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Neutered Tax Cuts

The drive for tax cuts obscures the greater benefit of tax reform and simplification.  Taxes, however, are only a single component of friction costs. If the purpose of tax reform or tax cuts is to stimulate investment and productive activity…

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The Half Life of Populism

From Kevin Williamson at National Review, ‘Winning’ Isn’t Winning It is often the case that populism has a short shelf life, after which is ceases to be popular. There is a reason for that: Populism is almost always based on…

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The 97% Fraud

from National Review and Ian Tuttle, The 97% Solution Surely the most suspicious “97 percent” study was conducted in 2013 by Australian scientist John Cook — author of the 2011 book Climate Change Denial: Heads in the Sand and creator of…

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The Dictated Truth

from Rupert Darwall in National Review, The Spiral of Silence: One-sided media reporting is a striking feature of the climate and energy debate. “Climate denier” and “tool of malign fossil-fuel interests” are epithets used to delegitimize dissent and quash diversity…

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Politics as Performance Art

From National Review Kevin Williamson writes McHealthcare Deluxe- The Affordable Care Act is a failed political product. There are better and worse ways to fail, and it pays to be conservative when trying out new products, most of which fail, or investing…

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Quietly Getting Better

from Victor Davis Hanson at National Review, It’s 1968 All Over Again: The smears “racist,” “fascist,” “white privilege,” and “Nazi” — like “Commie” of the 1950s — are so overused as to become meaningless. There is now less free speech…

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Blinded by Outrage

from Matthew Continetti at National Review, Pop Goes the Liberal Media Bubble The other day, for example, Bob Schieffer observed on Face the Nation that one in five journalists live in New York, D.C., or Los Angeles. The news is manufactured…

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