Tag Archives

Archive of posts published in the tag: National Review Online

Bi Partisan Corporatism

“Left and Right alike are partly or wholly captive to the fantasies of managerial progressivism and neo-mercantilism, with the Left imagining that Washington can intelligently direct energy and labor markets and much of the Right falling in behind protectionism, “managed trade,” and corporate welfare for everybody from Boeing to Foxconn.”

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The High Cost of Free Stuff

from Kevin Williams at National Review, There is No Alternative, excerpt: Socialism has two relevant features: Central planning of the economy by political powers and the public provision of ordinary goods (as opposed to public goods such as national defense…

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Clinton Commodities Trading- A Reminder

from The Shiny Object Fallacy by Kevin Williamson in National Review Online The wise political entrepreneur uses more opaque methods to make his purchases. Hillary Rodham Clinton walked away from the inquiry into her remarkably successful commodities-trading career unscathed, in…

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The Return on Capital is Not Inevitable

From Michael Barone at National Review- Equality at the Expense of Prosperity: Economist Tyler Cowen takes issue with another of Piketty’s assumptions, that the rich can earn 4 to 5 percent on their wealth “automatically, with the mere passage of time,…

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No CPAC of the Left

Kevin Williamson writes The Destroyer Cometh in National Reveiw Online: It is easy to be anti-fracking when that does not require you to give up anything, easy to oppose the expansion of the Keystone pipeline network when you can be confident that…

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Extrapolating a False Conclusion

From Michael Barone at National Review- Equality at the Expense of Prosperity: “There’s a persistent tension,” writes Bloomberg’s Clive Crook, “between the limits of the data [Piketty] presents and the grandiosity of the conclusions he draws.” Like global-warming alarmists, he extrapolates from…

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The Physical Economy

Kevin Williamson writes Welcome to the Paradise of the Real in The National Review Online.  It is a bit long but quite worthy of the time to read it in its entirety. Excerpts: The farther away we move from the physical economy…

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Piketty’s Questionable Data

From Michael Barone at National Review- Equality at the Expense of Prosperity: But is his picture of current trends complete? The Manhattan Institute’s Scott Winship points out that relying, as Piketty does, on tax returns for the U.S. statistics means…

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The Other Kochs

Matthew Continetti writes in The National Review Online Oligarchy in the 21st Century Excerpts: If the business editors of the Times were aware of the irony of lamenting the political influence of great wealth on one half of their page while handling…

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Schools Matter

  Mona Charen writes in National Review What Sotomayor Gets Wrong . Excerpts: Sotomayor’s argument rests entirely on a fallacy — that lowering admission standards for certain minority applicants is the only possible response to concerns about racial and ethnic…

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The Thomas Piketty Reader

From Stephen Moore at Investor’s Business Daily, The Left’s Advice Would Bring A Second Great Depression: One oddity of the current economic debate is that the more Barack Obama’s incompetent income-redistribution policies have failed, the more the left calls for…

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Prone to Corruption

from National Review Online, Jim Geraghty writes Why Liberals Can’t Govern: That argument is strongly disputed, but the Obama administration has proven the flip side of the coin: Liberals’ belief in the inherent goodness of a far-reaching federal government drives them to…

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Genghis Khan and AGW

  From The National Review Online, Alec Torres writes  Global Warming & the Mongolian Empire’s Rise: Now a recent study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences argues that there is a correlation between increasing global temperatures and the rise of the Mongolian…

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The Point of Journalism

Kevin Williamson writes The Destroyer Cometh in National Reveiw Online: Mr. Stewart is among the lowest forms of intellectual parasite in the political universe, with no particular insights or interesting ideas of his own, reliant upon the very broadest and…

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Targets on Our Backs

From Jim Talent writing  Sowing the Wind at National Review Online: A great nation with neither power nor strategic purpose is just as vulnerable, and perhaps more so, than a small nation. Great nations have targets on their backs. They can never…

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Sacrificing the Trust of the Governed

From National Review Online, Jeffery Singer writes The ACA: A Train Wreck and a Lie. Excerpts: Before 1996, if you purchased individual health insurance through a broker, you would have been offered a “guaranteed renewability” option. This would guarantee that…

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The Abdication of Credibility

Victor Davis Hanson writes 2017 and the End of Ethics in National Review Online: Excerpts: During the next presidency, will the filibuster still be bad, or will it suddenly be good again? Will there be a nuclear option again? Recess…

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One Percent Hypocrites

from The National Review Online Matthew Continetti writes The Inequality Business: Excerpts: It’s a funny thing about the inequality debate that has consumed the American intelligentsia for the past several years: The individuals who are most interested in identifying, describing,…

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The Real Minimum Wage

Kevin Williamson adds some clarity to the minimum wage debate in The Minimum-Wage Myths in The National Review Online. Excerpts: The purpose of this fight is not to hash out economic questions related to low-income people. The purpose of the fight…

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A Necessary Evil or a Necessary Good

From Jonah Goldberg in The National Review Online, Father Knows Best: The president’s more intellectually honest defenders have said exactly that. “Vast swathes of policy are based on the correct presumption that people don’t know what’s best for them. Nothing…

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