Tag Archives

Archive of posts published in the tag: Deirdre McCloskey

Corporatism is not Capitalism

Keynes suggested the use of government to make more efficient allocations of capital but was often critical of the incompetence of government officials.  He seems to unknowingly refute himself.  The weak accountability in government action is what distinguishes it from market solutions.  The worst solution is the pairing of select firms to partner with government actors.  When the results fail capitalism is faulted, bur corporatism is not capitalism.

Read More

Identity Politics Goes Nuclear

These institutions were under full frontal assault in the Kavanaugh hearing.  In desperation to preserve their most cherished right they dropped all pretenses of loyalty to the institutions that protect all of our rights.  They are willing to sacrifice due process and the presumption of innocence to even the smallest threat to Roe v Wade.

Read More

Little Platoons of Civil Society

Socialism and its cousin, Progressivism, are not the forward-thinking ideologies they pretend, but regressions to the natural tendencies of man.

Read More

Progress is Not Inevitable

Reform is seductive.  The faults of the status quo and our current institutions are vivid, magnified in an academic media complex that considers ‘viral’ an achievement. Reform is inchoate and illusive with faults yet to be recognized, presently clear only in the minds of critics and reactionaries.  In the future these faults are the subject of history.

Read More

Some Thoughts on 2017

“History does repeat itself, but the soundtrack is different, and the sequel is usually disappointing”. – HO

Read More

Liberty and Unemployment

From Deirdre McCloskey in Reason Magazine, The Myth of Technological Unemployment Helping the poverty-stricken is laudable. But we can’t subsidize 1.7 million people a month. Nor is job retraining a good idea when directed from above: The wise heads in Washington…

Read More

The True Dynamic of Employment

From Deirdre McCloskey in Reason Magazine, The Myth of Technological Unemployment In 1910, one out of 20 of the American workforce was on the railways. In the late 1940s, 350,000 manual telephone operators worked for AT&T alone. In the 1950s, elevator…

Read More

The Point of an Economy

From Deirdre McCloskey in Reason Magazine, The Myth of Technological Unemployment When a Ford plant installed robots, Walter Reuther, a long-ago president of the United Auto Workers union, is said to have asked a manager: “How are you going to get…

Read More

Scientific Paradise

from Sarah Hoyt, Poor Darlings: Back in the early twentieth century, when “scientific” everything was shiny and chrome, they were “scientific” governance.  All that bs about semantics, and psychology as a hard science you find in early Heinlein books?  Yep, that…

Read More

Foolish Measures of Happiness

The main problem, though, as I said, is that the insights of poets and taletellers and historians and philosophers from the beginning into what human man happiness actually is have simply been bypassed. “Happiness” viewed as self-reported mood is surely…

Read More

Pessimism Sells

Admittedly, myopic pessimism, from the right or left, sells. The late Allan Bloom’s right-wing pessimism, The Closing of the American Mind (1987), sold half a million copies merely in hardback. Shortly afterward, at a little conference we both attended, Allan…

Read More

Recouping Dignity

The concluding paragraphs of Deirdre McCloskey’s Bourgeois Dignity- Why Economics Can’t Explain The Modern World: Yet innovation, even in a proper system of the virtues, has continued to be scorned by many of our opinion makers now for a century…

Read More

The Clerisy vs History

The clerisy’s anti-innovation and antimarket and antiliberty rhetoric in the years since 1848, though repeated down to yesterday, misapprehends the scientific history. The clerisy says that every spillover in the environment justifies world-governmental control. Scientific economics suggest that it does…

Read More

The Marginal Utility of Happiness

Look again at your own ancestors compared with your present condition. You are much better off, and have much more scope to pursue Bildung. Admittedly you don’t own a seventy-five-foot yacht. Too bad. Being an adult person of sense, however,…

Read More

Wait for the Second Act

Nor during the Age of Innovation have the poor gotten poorer, as people are always saying. On the contrary, the poor have been the chief beneficiaries of modern capitalism. It is an irrefutable historical finding, obscured by the logical truth…

Read More

The Great Progressive Fallacy

from Don Boudreaux at Cafe Hayek (highly recommended) , a quote from Robert Higgs: Nothing has done more to render modern economic theory a sterile and irrelevant exercise in autoeroticism than its practitioners’ obsession with mathematical, general-equilibrium models.  Not only…

Read More

The Treason of the Clerisy

Yet in the late nineteenth century the artists and the intellectuals-the “clerisy,” as Samuel Taylor Coleridge and I call it-turned against liberal innovation. The treason of the clerisy led in the twentieth century to the pathologies of nationalism and socialism…

Read More

Why Government Should Be Irrelevant

by Henry Oliner Deidre McCloskey in Bourgeois Equality and Joel Mokyr in Culture of Growth examine the incredible growth in human betterment since 1850. Thomas Malthus predicted a dismal future for human kind from the very logical prediction that food…

Read More

The Root Cause of Our Success

from Deirdre McCloskey at The New York Times,  Equality, Liberty, Justice and Wealth: You may object that ideas are a dime a dozen and that to make them fruitful we must start with adequate physical and human capital and good institutions.…

Read More

Obscuring Intellectual Failure

Don Boudreaux at Cafe Hayek quotes from Deirdre McCloskey’s outstanding Bourgeois Equality in his Bonus Quotation of the Day: Members of the left clerisy, such as Tony Judt or Paul Krugman or Thomas Piketty, who are quite sure that they…

Read More