Category Archives

Archive of posts published in the category: Business

Power and Blockchain

from Richard Fernandez at PJ Media, The End of the Memory Hole But just to illustrate how things have changed for the State we now know that Orwell was wrong.  The mathematically dominant method for recording transactions, whether they involve the transfer of financial assets, intellectual…

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Determined to Save

From Barron’s Stephanie Pomboy: A Grim Outlook for the Economy, Stocks by Leslie Norton Post-crisis, the consumer has clearly pulled back. How many months did we have disappointing retail sales numbers that no one could explain? They’d say it’s too…

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The Buyer of Last Resort

So there we have it. The unicorn buyer of last resort will be the Fed. The “lender of last resort” for the financial system, the governmental guarantor for all the big banks and other “systemically important financial institutions,” the backup…

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Gilded Progressives

from The Great Regression in The National Review by Victor Davis Hanson At the turn of the last century, “trust busters” of the progressive movement made the argument that the free market was imperiled by crony capitalists, who had, with…

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Bridges to Stagnation

from The Clinton Plan’s Growth Deficit by John Cochrane in The Wall Street Journal America’s foremost economic problem is sclerotic growth. If the economy continues to expand at only 1% to 2% a year, instead of the historical 3% to…

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Fix the Structure of Government

from The Clinton Plan’s Growth Deficit by John Cochrane in The Wall Street Journal Her speech Thursday at least identifies the problem: “Powerful special interests and the tendency to put ideology ahead of political progress have led to gridlock in Congress.” To…

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It’s the Growth, Stupid

Scott Grannis at Calafia Beach Pundit is one of my favorite economics bloggers. He does not post often, but when he does he produces some real gems.  His work includes illuminating graphs that supports his clear analysis. While I have…

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The True Costs of Compliance

from Daniel Yergin at the WSJ, Markets Run Into Skepticism—and Regulators There had been a shift in the balance of confidence—the respective weighting in people’s minds between the role of markets and government, between the invisible hand and the visible one.…

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Capitalization vs Regulation

While the left claims the greedy 1% led us to financial ruin, years of reflection indicate that wrongheaded regulation and policy had much to do with magnifying the depth of the recession. Deregulation was not the problem, wrong regulation was…

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Thoughts on Brexit

by Henry Oliner Many Americans have become familiar with basic economic concepts because it affects them so regularly, but our understanding usually stops at our shore. The Brexit vote has us scratching our head to comprehend something we hardly knew…

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Every Business Is a Social Science Experiment

from Kevin Williams at National Review,Why does this gas station pay so well? When I mentioned my surprise at what it pays to work at a gas station in Bastrop, I got two reactions, both predictable. One was from a…

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Employment and Capital

A business makes a capital investment for two reasons: one is to expand production to meet rising consumer demand, and another is to increase efficiency or reduce cost.  The first reason is common during a growing economy and such investment…

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Uber Challenges the Regulatory State

Uber reduces DUIs, traffic fatalities, and accidents. The drivers are safer because it is cashless and the entire trip is tracked online. And they carry more insurance than the cabs. They are more available and better serve their customers. By…

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Work and Poverty

The left is unable or unwilling to articulate any limitation of the welfare state and unable or unwilling to acknowledge the social costs of long term dependency. Moves to push the recipients to work must recognize and correct the policy…

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The Secret to Berkshire’s Success

By Henry Oliner For the third consecutive year I attended the Berkshire Hathaway annual meeting in Omaha.  It has become a tradition for a group of us attending to meet the first night at Drovers Steakhouse where they marinate the…

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When Ideas Start Having Sex

The internet gave rise to Google and Facebook. The iPhone gave rise to Uber. The ideologies are important only to the extent that they facilitated ideas. Our current development is less dependent on assets and physical capital than ideas. We…

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Good Enough

from Martin Conrad at Barron’s; Finding the Path to Enrichment Smith argued that man was an economic animal who, by his bargaining and exchanging in the marketplace, could benefit from the diverse talents and genius of all his fellow men.…

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The Wall of Worry

an excellent post from Scott Grannis at Calafia Beach Pundit, The Bad news is why I am optimistic Grannis is one of my favorite economics bloggers- and one of the few that seems to combine a sense of harsh reality…

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Selective Free Enterprise

I watched with incredulity as businessmen ran to the government in every crisis, whining for handouts or protection from the very competition that has made this system so productive. I saw Texas ranchers, hit by drought, demanding government-guaranteed loans; giant…

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Policy Under False Pretenses

from Mark Perry at Carpe Diem,  New BLS data show that for all ‘chief executives,’ the ‘average CEO-to-average worker pay ratio’ is less than 5-to-1 For the sample of 20,620 CEOs reported by the BLS, their average pay increased only…

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