Monthly Archives: June 2014

Archive of posts published in the specified Month

Liberals and Progressives

Charles Murray writes in The Wall Street Journal, The Trouble Isn’t Liberal. It’s Progressives. Excerpts: It is that core philosophy extolling the urge to mold society that still animates progressives today—a mind-set that produces the shutdown of debate and growing…

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Kurdish Success

Victor Davis Hanson writes in Investment Business Daily, Revisionists Have A Field Day On Why We Invaded Iraq. Excerpt:  Prior to our invasion, the Kurds were a persecuted people who had been gassed, slaughtered and robbed of all rights by Saddam.…

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Employers’ New Competition

A Recovery Stymied by Redistribution in The WSJ by Casey Mulligan I met a recruiter—a man whose job it is to find employees for businesses and put unemployed people into new jobs—and he described the trade-off pretty well. Stacey Reece…

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Relative Poverty

Do people mind more about inequality than poverty? from Matt Ridley at his blog The Rational Optimist Excerpt: Here’s another question that I fancy the chimps would beat the people at: did poverty and inequality in Britain increase or decrease…

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The Arab Spring and Iraq

From Frontpage, Don’t Blame Bush for Al Qaeda in Iraq, Blame Obama, by Daniel Greenfield: If you believe liberal supporters of Obama and opponents of the Iraq War, regime change in Iraq disastrously destabilized the region, but regime change in…

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Keynesian Chemotherapy

One of the recurring general themes in my years of blogging is the flawed logic in many of the ideas proposed by some of our most educated and brightest commentators and policy makers.  There are many books that address the…

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Inequality is the Result of Meritocracy

Jonah Goldberg writes Mr. Piketty’s Big Book of Marxiness in the July issue of Commentary. Excerpt: “The consequences for the long-term dynamics of the wealth distribution are potentially terrifying,” Piketty writes. For instance, Piketty fears that whenever the return on capital really…

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Why Inequality Has Increased Under Obama

The economy has had one of the weakest recoveries is history as a result of higher taxes, higher regulations and an attitude and policy generally unfriendly to job creation and investment risk.  This comes after years of increased intrusion into…

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Iraq Revisionism

Victor Davis Hanson writes in Investment Business Daily, Revisionists Have A Field Day On Why We Invaded Iraq. Excerpt: Do we remember that Bill Clinton signed into law the Iraq Liberation Act of 1998 that supported regime change in Iraq? He…

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Capitalism is Not Inevitable

Kevin Williamson writes Welcome to the Paradise of the Real in The National Review Online.  It is a bit long but quite worthy of the time to read it in its entirety. Excerpts: We treat the physical results of capitalism as though…

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The Party of the Wealthy

Matthew Continetti writes in The National Review Online Oligarchy in the 21st Century Excerpts: The campaign against inequality and the call for higher taxes and the regulatory burdens placed on extractive industries further the self-interest of the liberals who rule our…

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Money Without Class

From National Review by Celina Durgin, Here’s How Little Chelsea Clinton Cares About Money, In Dollars Excerpt: How indifferent is she to the lure of filthy lucre? Clinton is currently pulling down $600,000 per year for the kind of no-show…

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The Discretionary Data on Inequality

Jonah Goldberg writes Mr. Piketty’s Big Book of Marxiness in the July issue of Commentary. Excerpt: The most common and strongest complaint is that Piketty’s arrangement of the data paints a false picture of rising inequality in the United States. Harvard’s…

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The Value of a Social Security Right of Exit

“Social Security was an extraordinarily good deal for the first beneficiaries. Over time, the program has become less and less of a good deal, and will continue to do so. And it looks even less attractive relative to plausible alternatives.…

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Governed by Fools

from By the Book, an article by Kevin Williamson in The National Review: We conservatives are great enthusiasts for the devolution of government powers, the subsidiarity that so moved Alexis de Tocqueville, who wrote that such an arrangement has “not…

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Bureaucratic Collectivism

From The National Review, Jonah Goldberg writes  Of the Bureaucrats, by the Bureaucrats, for the Bureaucrats Excerpts: In 1939, Bruno Rizzi, a largely forgotten Communist intellectual, wrote a hugely controversial book, The Bureaucratization of the World. Rizzi argued that the Soviet Union…

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Sacrificing the Bad to the Worse

On the unfolding Iraqi disaster: From The Wall Street  Journal, The Iraq Debacle Excerpt: The magnitude of the debacle now unfolding in Iraq is becoming clearer by the day, with the terrorist army of the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham,…

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The Fight for the Soul of the GOP

from The Daily Beast, Big Business Vs. Libertarians in the GOP excerpt Big business took a big loss in Virginia Tuesday, as House Majority Leader Eric Cantor lost his seat to little-known Tea Party favorite David Brat, who had criticized Cantor for…

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Inequality vs Mobility

From my article in American Thinker, Everything that Counts: Vast inequalities may harbor the potential for social unrest, but that is muted by social mobility.  Oprah and Andre Young (Dr. Dre) may have been born in poverty, but that has…

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The Sin of Science

The real risks of cherry picking scientific data by Matt Ridley and his blog The Rational Optimist To illustrate how far this problem reaches, a few years ago there was a scientific scandal with remarkable similarities, in respect of the non-publishing of…

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