Monthly Archives: May 2012

Archive of posts published in the specified Month

Juvenile Partisanship as Analysis

Economist John Cochrane writes in his worthy blog, The Grumpy Economist, Good Comments, 5/30/12. Excerpt: Economic analysis is more believable when it is non-partisan. I like commentators who make an effort to find silliness (and there is plenty of it)…

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Economics and Culture

Victor Davis Hanson writes Culture Still Matters in The National Review 5/31/12. Excerpt: But government-driven efforts to change national behavior often ignore stubborn cultural differences that reflect centuries of complex history as well as ancient habits and adaptations to geography…

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The Price of a Perfect Society

Utopianism substitutes glorious predictions and unachievable promises for knowledge, science and reason, while laying claim to them all. Yet there is nothing new in deception disguised as hope and nothing original in deception framed as progress.  A heavenly body is…

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The New Status Quo

Artur Davis, a Representative from Alabama and a failed gubernatorial candidate has switched to the GOP and moved to Virginia.   This is a significant move. I remember Davis as one who stood against the GOPers who were trying to…

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Hard Truths of Modern Warfare

When the Soviet Union lost the Cold War and the Berlin Wall came down, it was a momentous time. We expected peace in our time. Without two superpowers deterred by mutually assured destruction (MAD) the threat of a nuclear holocaust…

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Seven Quick Observations

Gas prices are headed down.  It is because of supply, demand, and reduced fear. Speculators have nothing to do with the increase or decrease over any extended period pf time. Is Mitt Romney considering Marco Rubio because they have the…

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The Canadian Lesson on Sound Banking

The default belief  of our economic history of the last 100 years has been an acceptance of the dynamic growth of capitalism punctuated by excesses of market greed that have to be corrected by the singular wisdom of government regulation.…

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A Hijacked Stimulus

Harvey Golub writes in The Wall Street Journal, 5/22/12,  How the Recovery Went Wrong. Excerpts: But wouldn’t things be even worse without massive fiscal and monetary stimulus? It’s true that monetary policy by the Federal Reserve has resulted in extraordinarily…

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Too Much Government for Sale

One of my favorite economics bloggers is Scott Grannis who writes Calafia Beach Pundit.  On Febuary 10, 2012 Scott wrote Obama: America’s Peron, comparing some of the policies of this administration with the policies of Peron during a period in Argentina…

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Why Third Parties Fail

With the level of dissatisfaction voiced by so many, a third party frequently becomes an attractive political fantasy. For a decade I had supported Libertarian candidates and after thirty years they gained minimal traction. (My commitment quickly waned when Libertarian…

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A Victim of Our Own Success

John Taylor writes Economics for the Long Run -Individuals should be free to decide what to produce and consume, and their decisions should be made within a predictable policy framework based on the rule of law in The Wall Street…

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Making Criminals of Us All

In my three or more decades of business experience and relationships I have only encountered a very small portion of the business owners. Yet it is striking how many I have encountered that had an encounter with the government that…

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An Elizabeth Warren Reader

The First blow to the Democratic majority was the election to fill the Senate seat of Ted Kennedy which was surprisingly won by Republican Scott Brown.  In the regular election the Democrats are trying to retake the seat with the candidacy of…

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Capital Sense

The J.P. Morgan loss is a non story.  It is not illegal to lose money. The loss was born by the shareholders, as it should be and they – not the regulators – should hold Morgan and Jamie Dimon accountable. Robert Samuelson…

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The Value of a Longer Term Perspective

Thomas Sargent gives an interesting perspective in An American History Lesson for Europe, in the Wall Street Journal 2/3/12. Excerpt: To finance canals and railroads, many state governments incurred large debts in the 1820s and 1830s. A financial crisis in…

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The Non-Problem of Fairness

The Editors of National Review responds to the President’s call for fairness in Buffetted by Taxes, 4/11/12 Excerpt: The Buffett Rule would function as a secondary alternative-minimum tax, putatively to accomplish what the primary alternative-minimum tax has failed to do: sock…

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Victorian Progressives

While the European socialist experiment is crashing and burning, this administration seeks to double down on emulating the continent that so many of our forefathers suffered greatly to leave behind. There is no better illustration of their commitment to cradle-to-grave…

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The Right to Exist

Menachem Begin’s election over Shimon Peres was a pivotal point in Israeli politics, the first time the Labor Party faced defeat. From his days with the Irgun, Begin was deemed an intransigent radical.  To many he was an obstacle to…

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Musings 2012 05 06- Kennedy, Warren, Julia, and Neckties

The Life of Julia is a slideshow on the Obama Biden campaign site showing how a fictional composite woman is aided and protected by government programs at every step of her life. There could not be a clearer statement of…

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Their Throats Are Choked With Oil

In the crisis of the 1973 Yom Kippur War Israel faced critical supply issues just as the Israeli Defense forces were turning the tide against disastrous early setbacks. Russia was flying endless loads of arms daily into Syria and Egypt. …

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